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I am really surprised to see how the mainstream media is pretty much ignoring the massive flooding in Nashville…Thu May 06 14:14:31 via web



The complaint that the national news media underplayed coverage of the Tennessee flooding and two dozen deaths in Middle and West Tennessee has a familiar ring.

The exact same complaint arose in the wake of the Tennessee Valley Authority’s coal ash catastrophe at TVA’s Kingston steam plant on Dec. 22, 2009. It was a week before national media began to latch onto that story.

And it has been a consistent complaint by some regarding the lack of attention the early January 2007 murders of Channon Christian and Christopher Newsom received in the media outside of Tennessee.

Andrew Romano at Newsweek tries to explain (but does not fully) why the national media is consistently slow to pick up on major breaking news happening in the U.S. beyond the bright lights of Times Square.

In all three cases, national media attention appeared to come more as a response to the drumbeat of criticism.

Is the hitherland that isolated from America’s media nerve centers?

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6 Replies to “This story intentionally left blank”

  1. Jack, you would be surprised.
    There are two levels of isolation:
    1) The general misconceptions of average urban coastal cities, whose only knowledge of the South and Midwest stems from Green Acres and Dukes of Hazzard stereotypes, and
    2) The reporters and editors who believe themselves to be in a different social strata altogether.
    Add those up, and you have everything you need for an unintentional disconnect from a wide swath of the nation.
    (You’d be surprised to know how many of them really think we don’t have shoes, indoor plumbing or multi-syllabic vocabularies.)

  2. Thanks for your comment, Ike. Given the always on, wired nature of today’s digital world, the disconnect is disconcerting. The tools are available to be more tuned it, but it almost seems as we are less so.

  3. I think this could be best summed up by a story my mother told about American Electric Power moving from New York to Columbus OH in the 1980s.
    A co-worker’s wife asked my mother (who was from WV)if they still had problems with indians that far west. My mother had to stop to figure out that they were actually serious about the question, and finally answered “You shouldn’t have any trouble with them, as long as you stay on major highways.”
    I amazes me how little people bother to learn about other parts of our country.

  4. If I were not on the internet I would not know what the heck you are talking about re the coal ash breach and the horrendous Christian-Newsome murders.
    I probably only would have been aware there was some flooding around Nashville because a friend was driving to Vanderbilt to pick up her kids and they told her to be careful. (And we were in the path of what was leftover from the storms.)
    Makes me wonder what they weren’t telling us about before I could go find out myself. I simply no longer get my news from the “news” shows.

  5. The MSM likes stories they can spin to attack conservatives.
    Why did a state law on immigration go nuclear? Because the media thought they could spin the story to show that conservatives are really racists.
    The media, however, never came up with a way to spin the more important Tennessee flood story to hurt conservatives so the human suffering caused by the floods isn’t worth reporting.
    The floods would have been a mega story if the media had figured out a way to spin them to show that George Bush was really a racist.

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