Let’s replay that

ICD-UX533Still like a voice recorder for capturing interviews instead of a smartphone?

But don’t know what to buy?

The Wirecutter may have done the evaluation for you. This week, the site recommended the Sony ICD-UX533 as its pick for “best voice recorder” (just $78 from B&H Photo) The site’s criteria was the voice recorder had to cost under a $100.

They trimmed a pool of dozens of recorders down to eight that were looked at closely. Of those, the Sony model was the pick.

Take a look at what it said and how it tested.

Here’s the SLAM ToolKit for journalists

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Do you have a “SLAM ToolKit?”

I presented what I call the SLAM ToolKit for journalists this afternoon to the Tennessee Press Association meeting in Knoxville.

SLAM stands for:

  • Simple
  • Lean
  • Affordable
  • Mobile

Yeah, it’s corny, but, hopefully, memorable.

You can see the deck here. In many categories, there may be better picks (and if there are, I’d like to know about them), but the first choices reflect apps I have used, at least a bit.

More mobile tools and resources for journalists.

Periscope is the buzz currently. If you are interested in using the streaming video app in news coverage, here are some general best practices and tips:

State of the First Amendment 2015

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

The First Amendment Center put out its annual State of the First Amendment report on Thursday.

Some highlights:

* Only 19 percent of Americans think the First Amendment goes too far in the rights it guarantees — the freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly and petition, a big shift from last year when 38 percent said the First Amendment went too far.

* 70 percent said the media is biased, 15 points higher than last year, but not as high as in 2011 when it reach 76 percent.

* Cameras Always On Dept.: 88 percent believe citizens should be able to record police activity, and 83 percent believe that any footage from police “body cams” should be part of the public record.

See full report (PDF).

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